Lawmakers Introduce Bill That Would Stop Grants to Sanctuary States That Give Driver’s Licenses to Illegal Immigrants

 

House and Senate Republicans have introduced legislation that would block certain federal funds from sanctuary states that allow illegal aliens to obtain driver’s licenses.

The Stop Greenlighting Driver Licenses for Illegal Immigrants Act would stop Justice Department (DOJ) grants that are a top source of federal criminal justice funding for states.

The legislation would target states that “defy federal immigration enforcement or that allow illegal aliens to get driver licenses without proof of lawful presence” and those that “prohibit or restrict a local or State government entity or official from collecting or sending to or receiving from the Department of Homeland Security immigration enforcement information.”

In the Senate, the legislation is being introduced by Tennessee Senator Marsha Blackburn and co-sponsored by Sens. Tom Cotton, R-Ark.; Kevin Cramer, R-N.D.; Shelley Moore Capito, R-W.Va.; Kelly Loeffler, R-Ga.; Joni Ernst, R-Iowa, and Mike Rounds, R-S.D. Companion legislation is being introduced in the House by Colorado Rep. Ken Buck. His bill is co-sponsored by 21 other lawmakers.

“Tennesseans know all too well what can happen when illegal immigrants are granted driver licenses,” Blackburn said in a statement. “While Tennessee and many other states prohibit driver licenses for illegal aliens, a growing number of states are moving in the opposite direction and unleashing dangerous open borders policies. Immigrants must follow the proper federal process and obtain citizenship or lawful status before obtaining a state driver license.”

“In America, no one is above the law,” she added.

Blackburn’s office estimated that states that issued licenses to illegal aliens received nearly $53 million that would be impacted by this new legislation during the 2019 fiscal year.

The NCSL reports that fifteen states and the District of Columbia have enacted laws to allow unauthorized immigrants to obtain drivers licenses. These states—California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Hawaii, Illinois, Maryland, Nevada, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, Oregon, Utah, Vermont and Washington—issue a license if an applicant provides certain documentation, such as a foreign birth certificate, foreign passport, or consular card and evidence of current residency in the state.

“In 2019, New Jersey, New York and Oregon became the most recent states to enact legislation extending drivers licenses and identification cards to those without proof of lawful presence,” their report noted.

More Americans infected with coronavirus

2/17/2020

The second of two flights carrying Americans home from the Diamond Princess cruise ship, quarantined in Japan, has landed in Texas. There were 380 Americans on board the ship, where dozens of passengers tested positive for the coronavirus.

Customs and Border Patrol Set to Deploy Elite Units to Sanctuary Cities to Assist ICE

CBP is serious about enforcing immigration law, even in cities that intend to flout it.

By  

Customs and Border Patrol is preparing to redeploy some of the agency’s highly trained tactical personnel throughout the nation’s “sanctuary cities” in order to support Immigration and Customs Enforcement.

The New York Times reported on the development Friday, that signals the Department of Homeland Security(which presides over both entities) is dead serious about national immigration enforcement, even in scofflaw municipalities that have sought to neuter it.

According to the report, more than 100 of CBP’s agents are being deployed throughout the nation to assist in ICE operations. It’s possible the agents could be tasked with apprehending illegal alien fugitives who are released onto the streets from local jail custody. They’ve been described as members of a unit known as BORTAC, an unit of personnel analogous to CBP’s SWAT team.

It’s common for sanctuary city jurisdictions to release individuals who are often violent criminals from custody, ignoring ICE detainer requests that the fugitives be instead handed over to face federal charges for immigration violations.

Sanctuary cities often create unnecessary risks to public safety by forcing ICE to arrest dangerous criminals off of the streets, when they could’ve been simply handed over from municipal jail systems to the federal agency. Eric Garcetti, the mayor of one of America’s biggest cities, openly admits that Los Angeles simply does not participate in immigration enforcement.

If scofflaw cities such as Philadelphia and Los Angeles are truly determined to undermine immigration law enforcement, then so be it. Attorney General Bill Barr has followed the lead of his predecessor, Jeff Sessions, in instituting new measures to punish the open borders cities, restricting them from federal law enforcement programs.

Conservatives shouldn’t be afraid of advocating for a strong federal government that will step in to perform the law enforcement duties sanctuary cities are cowering away from.

“If You Show Up with Cancer and You’re 95 – We Should Say We Can’t Do Anything” – Bloomberg Explains How Healthcare will Bankrupt Us Unless We Deny Care to Elderly

A new video posted on Sunday shows former New York City Mayor Mike Bloomberg explaining how healthcare will “bankrupt us,” unless we deny care to the elderly.

Mike Bloomberg: All of these costs keep going up. Nobody wants to pay anymore money. And at the rate we’re going healthcare is going to bankrupt us. So not only do we have a problem we’ve got to sit here and say which things we’re going to do and which things we’re not. Nobody wants to do that. If you show up with prostrate cancer and you’re 95 years old, we should say go and enjoy, you’ve had a long life, there’s no cure and we can’t do anything. If you’re a young person, we should do something about it. Society’s not willing to do that, yet.”

Spoken like a true heartless socialist.
How horrible.

 

From clothes to condoms: Coronavirus is threatening global consumption in ways you never knew were possible

CAP

China’s status as the world’s manufacturing powerhouse means the coronavirus epidemic’s effects are being felt in some odd places. We’ve come to terms with no new iPhones, but weirder shortages could upend people’s daily lives.

Plummeting iPhone production and a lack of new cars rolling off the assembly line dominated early discussion of coronavirus-induced shortages. But the epidemic currently sweeping China and making determined inroads into over two dozen other countries has forced hundreds of factories to close, affecting dozens of industries. If nothing else, coronavirus has made the world realize that globalization has its downsides.

Panic buying

It’s not just the virus itself that’s causing shortages, of course – rumors about the virus can be equally as devastating. Hong Kong, which is heavily dependent on China for many staples, has seen store aisles stripped of necessities like toilet paper, rice, and pasta in recent weeks as panic-buying ramps up while some factories struggle to reopen. Mere rumors of a toilet paper shortage earlier this month were enough to send thousands of locals pouring into stores to denude the shelves, triggering a rebuke from the government to those people “with evil intentions” spreading falsehoods “leading to panic buying and even chaos.”

No food

At the same time the virus disrupts its exports, China is having a difficult time getting meat into the country, its own pork supply decimated by a recent outbreak of African swine fever. The US, Europe, and Brazil are still shipping meat to China, but the refrigerated containers have to be handled carefully, plugged in as soon as they’re unloaded to keep the meat cold and moved out quickly to make way for other containers.

CAP

Citywide quarantines have limited the supply of workers to move meat in Shanghai and Xingang, meaning much never makes it off the ship.

No clothes

If anyone was hoping to break the monotony of quarantine with a little gym time, they’re out of luck unless they already have the duds. Athletic-wear behemoth UnderArmour revealed that coronavirus-related delays were causing shortages of fabric, packaging and raw materials, potentially reducing first-quarter revenues by up to $60 million.

They’re far from the only clothing brand hit hard by the outbreak – London-based designer Xuzhi Chen lamented that his clothes are manufactured in Shanghai, and he doesn’t know when production will be back online. He’s not alone in his plight – plenty of western brands have clothes made in China.

CAP

At the same time, Chinese buyers have stayed home from fashion shows in Milan and London, hitting even those Italian, and British brands that do their manufacturing at home hard.

No sex?! 

Selling a niche product doesn’t guarantee safety from the ravages of virus-related factory closures, either. The owner of a chain of Russian sex shops revealed he was feeling the coronavirus squeeze in an interview with Gazeta, lamenting that many of the products he sells are either made in China or have major components sourced from China.

Condom shortages in Singapore and Hong Kong would at first seem to suggest that people are using their quarantine time to get hot and heavy, but photos circulating on social media indicate the prophylactics are flying off the shelves for other reasons – to cover for shortages of gloves and masks, to start. About a quarter of the world’s condoms are made in China.

No sports 

Even sports stars have had to deal with coronavirus-induced shortages, a problem they might have expected their celebrity to insulate them from. Bauer Hockey, which makes custom hockey sticks for elite customers including many NHL players, saw its factory in Tongxiang City in Zhejiang province shut down last month and delay reopening twice.

The issue has apparently caused ripples in the league, leading to players being restricted to a “one-stick limit for practice and maybe two for games.” A player might typically go through several sticks in a single game, so while the shortage is very much a “first world problem,” it has caused much consternation in the hockey world.

CAP

No business

Coronavirus’ economic impact is likely to be felt far into the future. A handful of major trade shows have either been put on hold or canceled altogether, most notably the Mobile World Congress, the world’s largest smartphone trade show. Scheduled for later this month in Barcelona, the conference – which typically hosts 100,000 attendees – has been completely called off. Smaller events for brands like Swatch and Cisco have also gotten the axe. Even gatherings still on the calendar, like this week’s Singapore Airshow, will see attendance severely curtailed as over 70 exhibitors have pulled out. Multi-million-dollar deals that might have been sealed at these temples of commerce will fall by the wayside or be postponed until the return of a favorable business climate – and no one knows quite when that will be.

The virus has disrupted next week’s Berlin Film Festival, with over 50 Chinese delegates and several other international execs pulling out because they couldn’t get travel visas. The festival is supposed to include three Chinese features and one short, which presumably will be screened anyway – even if their directors are stuck home in quarantine. But with China an ever larger international market for films, the absence of the executives will be felt.

No communion

And the virus has caused behaviors to change even where it hasn’t reached epidemic levels. People are thinking twice before having unnecessary contact with others, and redefining what contact might be “necessary.” Our Lady’s Acomb Church in York has pressed pause on its Communion ritual, which involves drinking wine out of a communal chalice, “until further notice” – lest an infected parishioner sicken others.

Such symbolic attempts to stave off an uncertain, invisible threat exemplify the global response to an epidemic that is still not well understood: a combination of panic and prayer.

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑