Council advances plan to dismantle Minneapolis Police Dept

in this June 1, 2020 file photo, an emotional Terrence Floyd, second from right, is comforted as he sits at the spot at the intersection of 38th Street and Chicago Avenue, Minneapolis, Minn., where his brother George Floyd, encountered police and died while in their custody. A dispatcher who was …

By Breitbart – 6/26/2020

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — The Minneapolis City Council on Friday unanimously approved a radical proposal to change the city charter that would allow the police department to be dismantled, following mass public criticism of law enforcement over the killing of George Floyd.

The 12-0 vote is just the first step in a process that faces significant bureaucratic obstacles to make the November ballot, where the city’s voters would have the final say. And it came amid a spate of recent shootings in Minnesota’s largest city that have heightened many citizens’ concerns about talk of dismantling the department.

The Minneapolis force has come under heavy pressure since Floyd, a Black man in handcuffs, died May 25 after a police officer pressed his knee on Floyd’s neck for nearly eight minutes. Activists had long accused the department of being unable to change a racist and brutal culture, and earlier this month, a majority of the council proclaimed support for dismantling the department.

Doing so would first require amending the city charter. Draft language of the amendment posted online would replace the department with a Department of Community Safety and Violence Prevention, “which will have responsibility for public safety services prioritizing a holistic, public health-oriented approach.”

The amendment goes on to say the director of the new agency would have “non-law-enforcement experience in community safety services, including but not limited to public health and/or restorative justice approaches.” It also provides for a division of licensed peace officers, who would answer to the department’s director.

Council members who support the change are looking to seize on a groundswell of support for significant policing changes following Floyd’s death. If they don’t get the charter change on the November ballot, their next chance won’t come until November 2021, they say.

“It is time to make structural change,” Council Member Steve Fletcher said. “It is time to start from scratch and reinvent what public safety looks like.”

The proposed amendment is expected to be approved Friday, but that’s just a first step. It goes then to a policy committee and to the city’s Charter Commission for formal review. The commission’s recommendation doesn’t bind the council, but it takes time.

Barry Clegg, chairman of the Charter Commission, said the process feels rushed.

“As I understand it, they are saying, ‘We are going to have this new department. We don’t know what it’s going to look like yet. We won’t implement this for a year, we’ll figure it out,’” Clegg said. “For myself anyway, I would prefer that we figured it out first, and then voted on it.”

Clegg said that to get the proposed amendment question on the November ballot, it has to be finalized by Aug. 21. He said if the Charter Commission took its final action at its Aug. 5 meeting, there would likely be enough time for it to get passed by the full council, go through a veto period, and then, if vetoed, have time to spare for a possible mayoral veto override. Once on the ballot, the measure would go to voters.

Mayor Jacob Frey doesn’t support abolishing the department, a stance that got him booed off the street by activists who demonstrated outside his house following Floyd’s death and demanded to know where he stood.

Frey expressed concerns about the proposed amendment as currently drafted, including whether the change would eliminate police altogether or allow for a police presence going forward. He also said that when something currently goes wrong, the chief and the mayor are accountable — but under the new plan, accountability would be dispersed among 14 people. Frey also questioned whether policing practices would vary, based on ward or other factors.

“There is a significant lack of clarity. And if I’m seeing a lack of clarity, so are our constituents,” said Frey, who has said he supports deep structural change in the existing department.

Fletcher said under the new agency when someone calls 911, there will always be a response that’s appropriate, including the option for a response by employees authorized to use force. But he said the vast majority of calls that police officers currently take will be answered by employees with different expertise.

Miski Noor, an organizer with Black Visions, criticized the proposed amendment for creating a division of licensed peace officers at all. She said it “would give current and former police way too much power to shape public safety in Minneapolis.”

Steven Belton, president and chief executive of Urban League Twin Cities, said the way some council members went forward without a concrete plan is “irresponsible.”

“The problem that needs to be stated up front, from my perspective, is racism. … I’m not sure what they are trying to fix here,” he said.

Don Blyly, whose beloved science fiction and mystery bookstores were destroyed by arson in the unrest that followed Floyd’s death, said if local leaders do something “sufficiently stupid” when it comes to policing, he won’t reopen in Minneapolis.

“There are legitimate problems with the Minneapolis police, but the way the politicians are going about it is just ridiculous,” Blyly said. “They are pandering to a certain segment of the electorate.”

More than 700 Buildings In Minneapolis Damaged, Burned or Destroyed In Floyd Riots

Senseless destruction of a community.

By – 6/18/2020

A citywide survey conducted by the city of Minneapolis reveals that more than 700 buildings were either damaged, burned, or wholly destroyed in the riots that swept over the city following the death of George Floyd at the end of May.

A high resolution map reveals the location of every building damaged in the race riots. The destruction is spread widely throughout the city, although it’s most concentrated on Lake Street in the city’s downtown. Twelve buildings have been described as totally destroyed in the city’s report.

City authorities previously determined that more than $55 million in property damages had been inflicted upon the city through the riots. Democratic Mayor Jacob Frey has floated the idea of asking for a federal bailout to repair the damages from the riots, although it’s considered unlikely he’d succeed, having largely allowed the damages to occur when he failed to order a decisive police response to the riots.

Erik Hansen, director of economic policy and development for the city, highlighted the damages inflicted upon the community through the riots in a city report.

“This is not just the structures that have been impacted, it’s the community that’s been impacted, and if you take a look at where the destruction has happened, some of it is not because of the uprising, some of it is because people came into the community and tried to terrorize some neighborhoods and set buildings on fire.”

The significant damages to the city of Minneapolis remain a dark cloud from which the city may not recover. As leftists continue in a serious proposal to abolish the city’s police department and a sizable contingent of the city’s population begins looking to move elsewhere, the city may face a future of decline and blight.

Minneapolis Democratic Mayor Asking for $55 Million Federal Bailout to Repair Race Riot Damages

Now, he wants the taxpayer to pay for the riots.

By

Minneapolis Democratic Mayor Jacob Frey is ordering city officials to begin a wide-ranging query of the damage done to the city’s infrastructure from the race riots that began last week after the death of George Floyd, planning on requesting a federal bailout for the city to repair the damages done by “protestors.”

Early preliminary estimates gauge the price tag of property damage from the riots at more than $55 million dollars. Frey is already working with U.S. Senator Amy Klobuchar and representatives Ilhan Omar and Betty McCollum on a potential bailout package for the city.

However, McCollum described a more realistic picture on the prospect of the Twin Cities being granted a federal bailout, which would require approval from the Republican Senate and the signature of President Trump. In an email to the Minneapolis Star Tribune, she said the chances of a bailout were slim. “To be realistic, the odds of that happening are, at best, very difficult.”

Curiously, Frey seemed a lot less concerned about the economic and property damage impacts of the race riots when they were actually happening. Even the Democratic Governor of Minnesota, who proved almost equally inept at preventing mass destruction and controlling the volatile situation, slammed Frey for his refusal to deter the large crowds of criminal rioters, calling the city’s response to the riots an “abject failure.” Frey rebuffed suggestions to deploy the Minnesota National Guard before caving and giving in.

Minnesota Republicans have called upon both Tim Walz and Frey to resign, citing their utter failure to prevent riots that have now caused damages in the tens of millions to everyday Minnesotans and the Twin Cities community.

In a remarkable display of irresponsibility, the liberal Democrats cheering on rioting and property damages aren’t even willing to pay for the damages enacted in their own communities. As it turns out, the buck stops with the American taxpayer, many of whom they’d gladly point to as ones whom they’re protesting.

 

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