ENVIRONMENTALIST GROUP: “CORONA IS THE CURE – HUMANS ARE THE DISEASE”

Environmentalist Group: "Corona is the Cure - Humans are the Disease"

The mask slips.

By Paul Joseph Watson- March 25, 2020

A climate change group that aligns itself with Extinction Rebellion posted stickers claiming that coronavirus is a “cure” for the “disease” that is humanity.

“Earth is healing. The air and water is clearing,” tweeted Extinction Rebellion East Midlands. “Corona is the cure. Humans are the disease!”

The post shows stickers with the same message and the Extinction Rebellion logo plastered on lamp posts.

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When another branch of Extinction Rebellion challenged that this “does not follows XR’s principles,” the East Midlands chapter doubled down.

“We are pointing out that from the perspective of the Earth, humans behave like a disease. The idea is not to be,” they responded.

While Extinction Rebellion East Midlands may represent little more than the ravings of one idiot, the notion that humanity somehow deserved coronavirus and that it’s good for the planet has been widely shared by environmentalists and celebrities.

After actor Idris Elba tested positive for coronavirus, he claimed that COVID-19 was the planet “reacting to the human race” as revenge for climate change.

Despite numerous claims that nature is ‘flourishing’ and animals are thriving thanks to coronavirus, it turns out that most of those stories are fake news.

Man Charged with Terroristic Threat for Allegedly Coughing on Grocery Store Worker

The police state is growing because of the coronavirus pandemic.

By Shane Trejo

A man has been charged with a terroristic threat after allegedly coughing on a grocery store employee while saying that he had the coronavirus over the weekend.

This individual reportedly committed this assault at a Wegman’s in New Jersey. 50-year-old George Falcone of Freehold, N.J. is the suspect. He is also being charged with obstructing administration of law or other governmental function and harassment following the incident.

The incident took place on Sunday after a Wegman’s employee allegedly requested for Falcone to stand further away from her while she was preparing food. This reportedly offended Falcone, who leaned into her and purposefully coughed while facetiously saying that he had coronavirus while laughing. He faces up to seven years in prison and a fine up to $26,000 for his alleged actions.

Trending: SHOCK VIDEO: Chinese People Repeatedly Attempt to Spread Coronavirus in Public

“These are extremely difficult times in which all of us are called upon to be considerate of each other — not to engage in intimidation and spread fear, as alleged in this case,” said far-left New Jersey Attorney General Gurbir Grewal.

“We must do everything we can to deter this type of conduct and any similar conduct that harms others during this emergency,” he added.

Grewal, who opened the flood gates for illegal immigrants in his state, has used coronavirus pandemic as an excuse to crack down on supposed hate speech related to the origin of the virus.

Big League Politics has reported on Grewal’s proposed diversity gestapo:

New Jersey Attorney General Gurbir Grewal issued a “guidance” on Thursday telling employers that they may be guilty of illegal discrimination if they allow workers to call the COVID-19 coronavirus “the Chinese virus.”

“Among the guidance’s keynotes are that employers may be in violation of the LAD’s prohibition on disability discrimination if they fire an employee for exhibiting possible COVID-19 symptoms,” Grewal explained in his press release.

He added: “The guidance also states that employers must take reasonable action to stop harassment of one employee by another employee if the employer knows or should have known about it: for example, if one employee has east-Asian heritage and a coworker repeatedly harasses her by claiming that Asian people caused COVID-19 or calling this ‘the Chinese virus.’”

Grewal claims that noting the virus originated from China is a violation of the New Jersey’s Law Against Discrimination (LAD). During a time in which resources are being stretched in an unprecedented crisis, this is what Grewal is concerned about.

“COVID-19 is no excuse for racism, xenophobia, or hate,”Grewal said. “Discrimination and harassment in violation of New Jersey law remains illegal even if it occurs against the backdrop of a global pandemic. Now, more than ever, we should recognize that we’re all in this together. Words and actions that divide us won’t make any of us safer or stronger.”

He is urging citizens to snitch on their fellow man during the coronavirus crisis in case someone’s feelings get hurt.

When the coronavirus pandemic ends, it is not likely that Americans will regain the many liberties they have lost throughout the crisis.

 

MAN WHO LICKED PRODUCTS AT WALMART CHARGED WITH MAKING TERRORIST THREAT

Man Who Licked Products at Walmart Charged with Making Terrorist Threat

Missouri man asked, ‘Who’s afraid of the coronavirus?’ before licking various items on Walmart shelf

By Adan Salazar – March 25, 2020

A Missouri man who filmed himself licking products at a retail store was reportedly charged with making terrorist threats.

In the video which went viral on social media, Cody Pfister, 26, asks, “Who’s afraid of the coronavirus?” before proceeding to lick several items at a Walmart in Warrenton.

According to police, Pfister’s antics prompted anger across the globe, with people from several countries in Europe calling into the Warrenton Police Department to report the heinous act.

“A local resident who took a video of themselves licking the merchandise after making a ‘Corona Virus’ statement at Walmart and posting it to social media has been taken into custody,” Warrenton police wrote in a Facebook post.

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“This particular video, which won’t be shared here, has gained some international attention and we have received numerous reports about the video from locals, nearby residents, as well as people from the Netherlands, Ireland, and the United Kingdom.”

“We take these complaints very seriously and would like to thank all of those who reported the video so the issue could be addressed,” they added.

The Riverfront Times reports Pfister, who made the video on March 11 and has previously been convicted of burglary and firearm theft, was charged with making a terrorist threat, according to court documents obtained by the media outlet.

“Pfister was taken into custody this week, and Warren County prosecutors charged him today. The charge is a low-level felony,” reports The Times’ Doyle Murphy.

“Pfister was booked into the Warren County jail without bond.”

Pfister was possibly making the video in relation to the new coronavirus social media challenge, which had people licking objects such as toilet seats for social media clout.

One YouTuber who took part in the challenge and posted a video of him licking the rim of a public toilet seat reportedly contracted coronavirus following the stunt.

EU left Italy ‘practically alone’ to fight coronavirus, so Rome looked for help elsewhere, incl Russia

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The EU’s initial response to the massive outbreak of coronavirus in Italy was largely “inadequate,” and a lack of European solidarity opened the doors for Russia and China, former Italian Foreign Minister Franco Frattini told RT.

The new epicenter of the dreaded pandemic, Italy, has been struggling to stop the spread of Covid-19 for weeks now. The disease has already killed more than six thousand people in the country, with over 60 thousand people infected.

EU tried to pin the blame on Italy

The EU clearly underestimated the virus, blaming the outbreak in Italy on its national healthcare system flaws, according to the two-time foreign minister and OSCE representative. As a result, Brussels, which preaches pan-European solidarity, failed to act when this solidarity was needed in the face of a crisis that eventually affected the entire bloc.

Frankly speaking, Brussels is not doing enough. At the very first moment, Italy was practically alone against the virus. Many said it was all because of the Italian habits, because Italians do not respect the rules. Suddenly, they realized all the other countries were equally affected.

The situation in other major EU states like Germany and France deteriorated rapidly, forcing them to deal with thousands of infected on their own soil.

“Everyone just focused on the situation at home before even thinking about helping others,” Andrea Giannotti, the executive director of the Italian Institute of Eurasian Studies, told RT.

European solidarity doesn’t exist, only China can help us: Serbia goes full emergency over coronavirus

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The lack of solidarity was recently noted from outside of the bloc – Serbian President Aleksandar Vucic decried European solidarity as a myth, while praising Beijing for its assistance. His remarks came after Serbia received five million masks from China, which it could not get in Europe.

The EU is now trying “to do more” and somehow “make up” for its initial poor execution of a coordinated response, former Italian MP Dario Rivolta said.

Brussels has indeed ramped up its efforts, suspending the bloc’s strict Stability and Growth Pact regulating budgetary policy among others. Frattini particularly hailed this decision, which allows Rome to act freely in terms of budgetary spending, as “very important.” But this came only after Europe “realized its [measures] were inadequate to give a united response.”

Still, it is not enough, Rivolta told RT, adding that “for the moment,” there are no major changes. And while financial relief is necessary, there are other things to be considered, such as medical assistance.

“As for the medical aspects, the only thing that the EU did up to now was to put barriers between Italy and other countries.”

Huge support in terms of expertise

At one point, requests for help were sent out all over the world, according to Giannotti.

“Some Italian embassies were tasked with negotiating with local governments in order to find any opportunities to receive assistance from abroad, including help with equipment, which Italy lacks.” Russia and China were among those who responded.

In total, Moscow prepared nine cargo planes with emergency aid, delivering vital medical equipment and supplies, as well as bringing experienced specialists in infectious diseases and military doctors to Italy. Now they will be deployed to the most affected regions in the country’s north.

Frattini said the help was of the utmost importance: “What Russia has done is not comparable to what other countries have done, including China because China also sent something but not comparable with the support provided by Russia.”

The specialists have provided “very huge support in terms of expertise… in terms of virology.” 

With united Europe MIA in its Covid-19 response, worst-hit nations turn to ‘evil’ Russia & China for help

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The assistance serves as a gesture of solidarity in times of European sanctions on Moscow and the counter-measures, Giannotti said. Sending help “despite [the fact] the situation in Russia itself may also worsen” means it is a clear message that Moscow is ready to talk and settle issues with Europe when there is a greater need for cooperation.

Speaking to RT, the Italian ambassador to Russia, Pasquale Terracciano, agreed that a joint approach is the best way to put an end to the pandemic.

Thanking Moscow for the contribution, he said: “It will be crucial to recover from this tragic situation, hopefully soon.”

Homeland Security warns terrorists may exploit COVID-19 pandemic

By Alexander Mallin and Josh Margolin – 3/25/2020

A Department of Homeland Security memo sent to law enforcement officials around the country warns that violent extremists could seek to take advantage of the COVID-19 pandemic by carrying out attacks against the U.S.

“Violent extremists probably are seeking to exploit public fears associated with the spread of COVID-19 to incite violence, intimidate targets and promote their ideologies, and we assess these efforts will intensify in the coming months,” according to the intelligence bulletin, compiled by the agency’s Counterterrorism Mission Center and Countering Weapons of Mass Destruction Office.

At this time, DHS said it has “no information indicating any active plotting is underway,” but that it has observed certain extremist groups, both foreign and domestic, looking to spread misinformation about the coronavirus.

The memo, which was circulated on Monday, comes after assurances from FBI Director Chris Wray in a video message that agents would be even more vigilant in monitoring threats to the U.S. as the virus spreads.

“With all the worry and uncertainty out there, we want the public to know that there are still things they can count on: We’re here, and we’re going to stay here, to protect them, no matter what,” Wray said. “Because our criminal and national security adversaries sure aren’t going to take a day off — whether that’s for the coronavirus or, for that matter, anything else.”

Among the activities by extremist organizations cited in the DHS bulletin is a clipping from a weekly ISIS newsletter, which called for supporters to carry out attacks against overburdened health care systems in various Western countries.

Another portion of the bulletin singles out activity by white supremacists online who the DHS says have “advocated for violence against a range of targets, including critical infrastructure and faith-based and minority communities — including Asian Americans in response to the COVID outbreak.”

ABC News reported on Monday on an alert from the FBI’s New York field office that showed intelligence gathered on racist extremist groups, including neo-Nazis, that were encouraging followers who contract COVID-19 to spread the disease to Jewish people and police officers.

Countries are starting to hoard food, threatening global trade

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By Isis Almeida and Agnieszka de Sousa

Kazakhstan, one of the world’s biggest shippers of wheat flour, banned exports of that product along with others, including carrots, sugar and potatoes. Serbia has stopped the flow of its sunflower oil and other goods. Russia is leaving the door open to shipment bans and said it’s assessing the situation weekly.
To be perfectly clear, there have been just a handful of moves and no sure signs that much more is on the horizon. Still, what’s been happening has raised a question: Is this the start of a wave of food nationalism that will further disrupt supply chains and trade flows?

“We’re starting to see this happening already — and all we can see is that the lockdown is going to get worse,” said Tim Benton, research director in emerging risks at think tank Chatham House in London.

Though food supplies are ample, logistical hurdles are making it harder to get products where they need to be as the coronavirus unleashes unprecedented measures, panic buying and the threat of labor crunches.

Consumers across the globe are still loading their pantries — and the economic fallout from the virus is just starting. The specter of more trade restrictions is stirring memories of how protectionism can often end up causing more harm than good. That adage rings especially true now as the moves would be driven by anxiety and not made in response to crop failures or other supply problems.

Related video: Food supply is not where it’s needed

As it is, many governments have employed extreme measures, setting curfews and limits on crowds or even on people venturing out for anything but to acquire essentials. That could spill over to food policy, said Ann Berg, an independent consultant and veteran agricultural trader who started her career at Louis Dreyfus Co. in 1974.

“You could see wartime rationing, price controls and domestic stockpiling,” she said.

Some nations are adding to their strategic reserves. China, the biggest rice grower and consumer, pledged to buy more than ever before from its domestic harvest, even though the government already holds massive stockpiles of rice and wheat, enough for one year of consumption.

Key wheat importers including Algeria and Turkey have also issued new tenders, and Morocco said a suspension on wheat-import duties would last through mid-June.

a close up of a map: Food Dependence© Bloomberg Food Dependence

As governments take nationalistic approaches, they risk disrupting an international system that has become increasingly interconnected in recent decades.

Kazakhstan had already stopped exports of other food staples, like buckwheat and onions, before the move this week to cut off wheat-flour shipments. That latest action was a much bigger step, with the potential to affect companies around the world that rely on the supplies to make bread.

For some commodities, a handful of countries, or even fewer, make up the bulk of exportable supplies. Disruptions to those shipments would have major global ramifications. Take, for example, Russia, which has emerged as the world’s top wheat exporter and a key supplier to North Africa.

“If governments are not working collectively and cooperatively to ensure there is a global supply, if they’re just putting their nations first, you can end up in a situation where things get worse,” said Benton of Chatham House.

He warned that frenzied shopping coupled with protectionist policies could eventually lead to higher food prices — a cycle that could end up perpetuating itself.

“If you’re panic buying on the market for next year’s harvest, then prices will go up, and as prices go up, policy makers will panic more,” he said.

And higher grocery bills can have major ramifications. Bread costs have a long history of kick-starting unrest and political instability. During the food price spikes of 2011 and 2008, there were food riots in more than 30 nations across Africa, Asia and the Middle East.

“Without the food supply, societies just totally break,” Benton said.

Ample supplies have kept prices relatively low since the 2011 spike© Bloomberg Ample supplies have kept prices relatively low since the 2011 spike

Unlike previous periods of rampant food inflation, global inventories of staple crops like corn, wheat, soybeans and rice are plentiful, said Dan Kowalski, vice president of research at CoBank, a $145 billion lender to the agriculture industry, adding he doesn’t expect “dramatic” gains for prices now.

While the spikes of the last decade were initially caused by climate problems for crops, policies exacerbated the consequences. In 2010, Russia experienced a record heat wave that damaged the wheat crop. The government responded by banning exports to make sure domestic consumers had enough.

The United Nations’ measure of global food prices reached a record high by February 2011.

“Given the problem that we are facing now, it’s not the moment to put these types of policies into place,” said Maximo Torero, chief economist at the UN’s Food and Agriculture Organization. “On the contrary, it’s the moment to cooperate and coordinate.”

Read More on Food Issues in Virus Era:

There’s Plenty of Food in the World, Just Not Where It’s Needed

Americans Drop Kale and Quinoa to Lock Down With Chips and Oreos

Cargill Says China Offers Hope for Meat Markets Hit by Virus 

Of course, the few bans in place may not last, and signs of a return to normal could prevent countries from taking drastic measures. Once consumers start to see more products on shelves, they may stop hoarding, in turn allowing governments to back off. X5 Retail, Russia’s biggest grocer, said demand for staple foods is starting to stabilize. In the U.S., major stores like Walmart Inc. have cut store hours to allow workers to restock.

In the meantime, some food prices have already started going up because of the spike in buying.

Wheat futures in Chicago, the global benchmark, have climbed more than 6% in March as consumers buy up flour. U.S. wholesale beef has shot up to the highest since 2015, and egg prices are higher.

At the same time, the U.S. dollar is surging against a host of emerging-market currencies. That reduces purchasing power for countries that ship in commodities, which are usually priced in greenbacks.

n the end, whenever there’s a disruption for whatever reason, Berg said, “it’s the least-developed countries with weak currencies that get hurt the most.”

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