THE FBI IS NOW INVESTIGATING ‘IT’S OKAY TO BE WHITE’ POSTERS

The FBI is Now Investigating 'It's Okay to be White' Posters

A valuable use of their resources.

  – NOVEMBER 5, 2019

The FBI is now investigating ‘It’s Okay to be White’ posters after the “hate filled flyers” were posted around the campus of Western Connecticut State University.

After the flyers were discovered, university president John Clark characterized them as a ‘hateful attack’. Other flyers also posted on campus said “Islam is right about women.”

“Have no doubt that we are treating this as an attack on our university community and making every effort to see that those responsible are caught and properly punished,” Clark wrote in a letter. “I am fully committed to the absolutely necessary goal this does not happen again. We must be ever vigilant to protect our university against these hateful attacks.”

Clark added that if any student was found to be responsible for posting the flyers, they would be expelled as well as hit with possible “criminal actions.”

The FBI office in New Haven was also alerted and is now investigating the flyers.

As we reported yesterday, similar flyers were posted at the Oklahoma City University School of Law, prompting authorities there to launch a “hate crime” investigation.

Why the FBI hasn’t got anything better to do with its resources God only knows.

It’s not as if the flyers even need “investigating,” since we already know their origin.

The whole thing was a product of 4chan trolls who sought to repeat their stunt of posting the flyers on Halloween to bait the media into whipping up another moral panic about racism.

By prodding progressives and the press into suggesting that it’s not ‘okay to be white’ as proven by their hysterical overreaction, the trolls are in the process revealing the actual racism of leftists.

‘ISLAM IS RIGHT ABOUT WOMEN’ SIGNS APPEAR IN AUSTIN, TEXAS

'Islam is Right About Women' Signs Appear in Austin, Texas

Progressives still confused about who to be offended on behalf of.

  – OCTOBER 14, 2019

Having appeared in numerous cities all over the world last month, signs that read “Islam is right about women” have now been seen in Austin, Texas.

An image of the sign was posted on The Donald subreddit with the caption, “Which of you beautiful bastards plastered these all over SW Austin last night? My next door app is blowing up with confusion. Absolutely hilarious.”

The posters previously appeared in Winchester, Massachusetts, causing a mini moral panic and the police to be called in to investigate.

They also popped up in Limerick, Ireland, prompting a local councillor to assert that the signs were intended to “incite hate” towards “either women or Muslims” (she wasn’t sure who).

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The meme is a 4chan troll designed to confuse muddled leftists who attempt to support Islam and women’s rights at the same time without realizing how the two contradict each other.

What makes the meme funny is that leftists routinely react with outrage, but don’t know quite who to be outraged on behalf of.

If they find the message offensive, they can be accused of being bigoted towards Muslims.

However, if they don’t sufficiently explain why they are offended, they can be accused of being hateful towards women, given how some women are treated as second class citizens in Islamic societies.

“The result is that those who attempt to explain why the act is offensive end up simply tying themselves in knots, while revealing that they have never given a moment’s thought to the position they find themselves defending,” writes Alla Al-Ameri.

“This seems to generate even more anger, with the inevitable online mob quickly joined by politicians, journalists and other public figures, eager to see that the heretic is made an example of.”

Never Forget Images of 9/11: A Visual Remembrance

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By Rebecca Mansour

The whole world experienced the attacks of September 11, 2001, in real time. Videos, photos, and audio captured the horror inflicted by Islamic jihadists and the heroism displayed by ordinary Americans. In our effort to never forget, Breitbart News provides you a visual and audial remembrance of that fateful day when the world changed forever.

From the time of its opening in 1973 to that fatal day in September 2001, the Twin Towers of the World Trade Center dominated the skyline of Lower Manhattan’s Financial District, as seen in this photo taken on September 5, 2001, just six days before the Towers fell:

5 Sep 2001: The view of the New York skyline with the World Trade Center at sunset taken from the US Open at the UATA National Tennis Center in Flushing, New York.Mandatory Credit: Jamie Squire/Allsport

Designed by Detroit architect Minoru Yamasaki, the Twin Towers were famously disparaged by New York Times’ architectural critic Ada Louise Huxtable, who offered this unintentionally prescient prediction in 1966: “The trade center towers could be the start of a new skyscraper age or the biggest tombstones in the world.”

Those words were long forgotten on that bright September morning before death rained down from blue cloudless skies.

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Betty Ong, the flight attendant aboard American Airlines Flight 11, was the first person to notify authorities about the Islamic hijackers. The audio of Ong’s call to the American Airlines emergency number was included in this audio/video montage released by the TSA in 2018 to commemorate the 17th anniversary of 9/11:

The following video captured the moment of impact when Islamic hijackers flew American Airlines Flight 11 into the World Trade Center’s North Tower (1 WTC) at 8:46 a.m.

The first images of the burning North Tower quickly flashed across television sets. This video shows the first five minutes of cable news coverage:

Four minutes after the first plane hit the World Trade Center, Christopher Hanley, 35, called 911 from the 106th floor of the North Tower, where he was attending a conference at the restaurant Windows on the World that morning. This is the audio of his 911 call:

The whole world watched in horror as Islamic hijackers flew the second plane, United Airlines Flight 175, into the South Tower of the World Trade Center (2 WTC) at 9:03 a.m.

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A fireball erupts from one of the World Trade Center towers as it is struck by the second of two airplanes in New York, Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2001. In a horrific sequence of destruction, terrorists hijacked two airliners and crashed them into the World Trade Center in a coordinated series of attacks that brought down the twin 110-story towers. (AP Photo/Todd Hollis)

A ball of fire explodes from one of the towers at the World Trade Center in New York after a plane crashed into it in this image made from television Tuesday Sept. 11, 2001. The aircraft was the second to fly into the tower Tuesday morning. (AP Photo/ABC via APTN) TV OUT CBC OUT

Plumes of smoke pour from the World Trade Center buildings in New York Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2001. Planes crashed into the upper floors of both World Trade Center towers minutes apart Tuesday in a horrific scene of explosions and fires that left gaping holes in the 110-story buildings. (AP Photo/Patrick Sison)

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394261 06: Smoke pours from the World Trade Center after being hit by two planes September 11, 2001 in New York City. (Photo by Fabina Sbina/ Hugh Zareasky/Getty Images)

394273 03: Smoke billows from the World Trade Center's twin towers after they were struck by commerical airliners in a suspected terrorist attack September 11, 2001 in New York City. (Photo by Ezra Shaw/Getty Images)

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People in front of New York's St. Patrick's Cathedral react with horror as they look down Fifth Ave towards the World Trade Center towers after planes crashed into their upper floors in this Sept. 11, 2001, file photo. Explosions and fires collapsed the 110-story buildings. This year will mark the fifth anniversary of the attacks. (AP Photo/Marty Lederhandler/FILE)

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394261 29: A woman reacts in terror as she looks up to see the World Trade Center go up in flames September 11, 2001 in New York City after two airplanes slammed into the twin towers in an alleged terrorist attack. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

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A helicopter flies over the burning Pentagon Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2001. The Washington Monument can be seen at right, through the smoke. The White House roof is visible in the trees of Washington at left. (AP Photo/Tom Horan)

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Rescue worker look over damage at the Pentagon Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2001. The Pentagon burst into flames and a portion of one side of the five-sided structure collapsed after the building was hit by an aircraft in an apparent terrorist attack. (AP Photo/Kamneko Pajic)

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The south tower collapses as smoke billows from both towers of the World Trade Center, in New York, Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2001. In one of the most horrifying attacks ever against the United States, terrorists crashed two airliners into the World Trade Center in a deadly series of blows that brought down the twin 110-story towers. (AP Photo/Jim Collins)

394263 01: (PUERTO RICO OUT) An explosion rocks one of the World Trade Center Towers crumbled down after a plane hit the building. (Photo by Jose Jimenez/Primera Hora/Getty Images)

The south tower of New York's World Trade Center collapses Tuesday Sept. 11, 2001. In one of the most horrifying attacks ever against the United States, terrorists crashed two airliners into the World Trade Center in a deadly series of blows that brought down the twin 110-story towers. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)

394273 02: One of the World Trade Center's twin towers collapses after it was struck by a commerical airliner in a suspected terrorist attack September 11, 2001 in New York City. (Photo by Ezra Shaw/Getty Images)

People flee the falling South Tower of the World Trade Center on Tuesday, September 11, 2001. (AP Photo/Amy Sancetta)

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This is a view of the Manhattan skyline from Brooklyn, Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2001, after the World Trade Center towers collapsed following being struck by airplanes. (AP Photo/Kathy Willens)

NEW YORK, UNITED STATES: Smoke rises from the New York skyline 11 September 2001 after two hijacked planes crashed into the landmark World Trade Center. US military forces worldwide were on their highest state of alert after the attacks against the World Trade Center and Pentagon, Pentagon officials said. AFP PHOTO/JOHN MOTTERN (Photo credit should read JOHN MOTTERN/AFP/Getty Images)

Police officers and civilians run away from New York's World Trade Center after an additional explosion rocked the buildings Tuesday morning, Sept. 11, 2001. In unprecedented show of terrorist horror, the 110-story World Trade Center towers collapsed in a shower of rubble and dust Tuesday morning after two hijacked airliners carrying scores of passengers slammed into the sides of the twin symbols of American capitalism. (AP Photo/Louis Lanzano)

394273 10: Smoke billows from the World Trade Center's twin towers after they were struck by commerical airliners in a suspected terrorist attack September 11, 2001 in New York City. (Photo by Ezra Shaw/Getty Images)

Flags fly at half-staff at the Liberty Science Center in Jersey City, N.J. as a large cloud of smoke billows from a fire at the World Trade Center in New York, Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2001. In one of the most devastating attacks ever against the United States, terrorists crashed two airliners into the World Trade Center in a closely timed series of blows that brought down the twin 110-story towers. (AP Photo/Daniel Hulshizer)

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The Statue of Liberty stands as smoke billows from the World Trade Center in New York, Tuesday, Sept 11, 2001 after terrorists crashed two hijacked airliners into the World Trade Center and brought down the twin 110-story towers. (AP Photo/Stuart Ramson)

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. **FOR USE AS DESIRED. COMPANION IMAGE NY226 FILE** THEN AND NOW. ONE IN A SERIES OF PHOTOS SHOWING IMAGES OF THE SEPT. 11, 2001, ATTACKS AND ITS AFTERMATH AND THE SAME SCENE SHOT BY THE SAME AP PHOTOGRAPHER IN JUNE 2006 Pedestrians on Beekman St. flee the area of the collapsed World Trade Center in lower Manhattan following a terrorist attack on the New York landmark in the Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2001 file photo. (AP Photo/Amy Sancetta,FILE)

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A police officer helps a woman to a bus after she fled the area near the World Trade Center towers 11 September, 2001, in New York. Two planes crashed into each building and the tops of each tower later collapsed AFP PHOTO/Stan HONDA (Photo credit should read STAN HONDA/AFP/Getty Images)

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394261 33: ( NEWSWEEK, US NEWS, GERMANY OUT) Police escort a civilian from the scene of the collapse of a tower of the World Trade Center September 11, 2001 in New York City after two airplanes slammed into the twin towers in an alleged terrorist attack. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

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394261 33: ( NEWSWEEK, US NEWS, GERMANY OUT) Police escort a civilian from the scene of the collapse of a tower of the World Trade Center September 11, 2001 in New York City after two airplanes slammed into the twin towers in an alleged terrorist attack. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

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394261 40: People evacuate the area around the World Trade Center after it was hit by two planes September 11, 2001 in New York City. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)

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394277 05: A car sits on its side amid rubble at the World Trade Center after two hijacked planes crashed into the Twin Towers September 11, 2001 in New York. (Photo by Ron Agam/Getty Images)

Cars are covered in rubble after the collapse of one of the World Trade Center Towers 11 September, 2001 in New York. US President George W. Bush is to call a meeting of his top national security aides to address terrorist attacks that levelled the World Trade Center and left part of the Pentagon in ruins. AFP PHOTO Doug KANTER (Photo credit should read DOUG KANTER/AFP/Getty Images)

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NEW YORK, UNITED STATES: A man walks through the rubble after the collapse of the first World Trade Center Tower 11 September, 2001 in New York. AFP PHOTO Doug KANTER (Photo credit should read DOUG KANTER/AFP/Getty Images)

NEW YORK, UNITED STATES: US-WTC-THEN AND NOW-ED FINE 1(FILES) This file photo dated 11 September 2001 shows Edward Fine covering his mouth as he walks through the debris after the collapse of one of the World Trade Center Towers in New York. Fine was on the 78th floor of 1 World Trade Center when it was hit by a hijacked plane 11 September. AFP PHOTO/Stan HONDA (Photo credit should read STAN HONDA/AFP/Getty Images)

NEW YORK, UNITED STATES: A man helps evacuate a woman through rubble and debris after the collapse of one of the World Trade Center Towers 11 September 2001 in New York after two hijacked planes crashed into the landmark skyscrapers. AFP PHOTO/Stan HONDA (Photo credit should read STAN HONDA/AFP/Getty Images)

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People cover their faces as they move across the Brooklyn Bridge out of the smoke and dust in Manhattan Tuesday Sept. 11, 2001, after a terrorist attack on the twin towers of the World Trade Center. Terrorists hijacked two airliners and crashed them into the World Trade Center in a coordinated series of blows that brought down the twin 110-story towers. (AP Photo/Daniel Shanken)

People flee lower Manhattan across the Brooklyn Bridge in New York, Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2001, following a terrorist attack on the World Trade Center. (AP Photo/Daniel Shanken) MANDATORY CREDIT

Pedestrians can be seen crossing the Brooklyn Bridge as they flee Manhattan after the collapse of the first World Trade Center Tower 11 September, 2001 in New York. AFP PHOTO Doug KANTER (Photo credit should read DOUG KANTER/AFP/Getty Images)

WASHINGTON, UNITED STATES: Traffic in Washington, DC, gets gridlocked 11 September, 2001, as US government workers are released and the city is shutdown following suspected terrorist attacks in Washington and New York city. The twin towers at the World Trade Center in New York were demolished after two hijacked passenger planes were crashed into the buildings. AFP PHOTO/TIM SLOAN (Photo credit should read TIM SLOAN/AFP/Getty Images)

President Bush watches television as he talks on the phone with New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani and Gov. George Pataki aboard Air Force One during a flight following a statement about the terrorist attack on the World Trade Center in New York City, Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2001. (AP Photo/Doug Mills)

President Bush talks with Chief of Staff Andrew Card aboard Air Force One during a flight to Offutt Air Force Base in Omaha, Neb., following the presidents' statement about the terrorist attack on the World Trade Center in New York City, Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2001. (AP Photo/Doug Mills)

AIR FORCE ONE,- SEPTEMBER 11: An F-16 fighter flies just off the wing of Air Force One on a flight back to Washington 11 September 2001. Bush returned to the White House where he will address the nation from the Oval Office on the terrorist attacks at the World Trade Center and the Pentagon. (Photo credit should read DOUG MILLS/AFP/Getty Images)

LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM: A trader of the stock exchange reads the evening paper with" Terror war on USA" on the front page 11 September 2001 outside the London stock exchange, following the terrorist attacks at the World Trade Center and the Pentagon in USA earlier today. (Photo credit should read NICOLAS ASFOURI/AFP/Getty Images)

Newspaper vendor Carlos Mercado sells the "Extra" editon of the Chicago Sun-Times printed 11 September, 2001, after the terrorist attacks on the United States. Two hijacked airplanes crashed into the World Trade Center twin towers in New York while one hijacked plane later crashed at the Pentagon in Washington, DC, with another plane crashing 80 miles outside of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. AFP PHOTO/Scott OLSON (Photo credit should read SCOTT OLSON/AFP/Getty Images)

Deputy U.S. marshal Dominic Guadagnoli helps a women after she was injured in the terrorist attack on the World Trade Center in New York, Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2001. (AP Photo/Gulnara Samoilova)

A shell of what was once part of the facade of one of the twin towers of New York's World Trade Center rises above the rubble that remains after both towers were destroyed in a terrorist attack Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2001. The 110-story towers collapsed after two hijacked airliners carrying scores of passengers slammed into the sides of the twin symbols of American capitalism. (AP Photo/Shawn Baldwin)

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394277 10: New York City firefighters take a rest frm rescue operations at the World Trade Center after two hijacked planes crashed into the Twin Towers September 11, 2001 in New York. (Photo by Ron Agam/Getty Images)

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Rescue workers make their way through the rubble of the World Trade Center 11 September 2001 in New York after two hijacked planes flew into the landmark skyscrapers. AFP PHOTO/Doug KANTER (Photo credit should read DOUG KANTER/AFP/Getty Images)

An exausted police officer rests on a car covered in dust near the World Trade Center 11 September 2001 in New York as people board a bus to be evacuated after two hijacked planes crashed into the landmark towers. AFP PHOTO/Stan HONDA / AFP / STAN HONDA (Photo credit should read STAN HONDA/AFP/Getty Images)

Smoke rises in the distance before the Long Island and the Throgs Neck Bridge 11 September 2001 between the Bronx and Queens, NY, following the destruction of the the twin towers of the World Trade Center. An apparent terrorist attack leveled the two buildings. AFP PHOTO/Matt CAMPBELL (Photo credit should read MATT CAMPBELL/AFP/Getty Images)

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** FILE ** From front left: Rep. Dick Armey, R-Texas, Sen. Harry Reid, D-Nev., Sen. Trent Lott, R-Miss., Senate Minority Leader, Sen. Tom Daschle, D-S.D., Senate Majority Leader, House Speaker Dennis Hastert, R-Ill., Rep. Richard Gephardt, House Minority Leader, Sen. Barbara Mikulski, D-Md., and other congressional members stand together on the steps of the Capitol to show unity, Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2001, in Washington, after a day which saw two planes crashes into the World Trade Center in New York, and one into the Pentagon, all considered acts of terrorism. The showing of national and political unity, displayed after the Sept. 11 attacks, is missing in 2005 after Hurricane Katrina and her deadly winds have subsided. (AP Photo/Kenneth Lambert)

Democrats and Republicans stood shoulder to shoulder on the steps of the Capitol that evening in a show of national unity. At the end of their remarks, they sang “God Bless America.”

President Bush is seen through the windows of the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2001, as he addresses the nation about terrorist attacks at the World Trade Center and the Pentagon. (AP Photo/Doug Mills)

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In this September 15, 2001 photograph, a woman poses with a picture of a missing loved one who was last seen at the World Trade Center when it was attacked on September 11, 2001.(AP Photo/Charlie Krupa)

In this September 13, 2001 photograph, a woman is comforted as she holds a picture of a missing loved one who was last seen at the World Trade Center when it was attacked on September 11, 2001.(AP Photo/Kathy Willens)

In this September 13, 2001 photograph, a man poses with a picture of a missing loved one who was last seen at the World Trade Center when it was attacked on September 11, 2001.(AP Photo/Kathy Willens)

In this September 13, 2001 photograph, a woman poses with a picture of a missing loved one who was last seen at the World Trade Center when it was attacked on September 11, 2001.(AP Photo/Kathy Willens)

A woman looks at missing person posters of victims of the September 11 terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center in New York City on Sept. 14, 2001.(AP Photo/Robert Spencer)

New York City Mayor Rudolph Giuliani consoles Anita Deblase, of New York, whose son, James Deblase, 44, is missing, at the site of the World Trade Center disaster, Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2001. "He's at the bottom of the rubble," she said. James Deblase worked for Cantor Fitzgerald at the World Trade Center. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty)

Military and fire personnel get set to unfurl a large American flag on the roof of the Pentagon, Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2001. A hijacked airliner crashed into the structure on Tuesday. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)

Firefighters unfurl an American flag from the roof of the Pentagon Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2001, as President Bush visits the area of the Pentagon where an airliner, hijacked by terrorists, crashed into the building on Tuesday. (AP Photo/Ron Edmonds)

A makeshift altar, constructed for a worship service, overlooks the the crash site of United Airlines Flight 93, Sunday, Sept. 16, 2001, in Shanksville, Pa. The plane was hijacked and crashed during Tuesday's terrorist attacks. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)

An American flag is posted in the rubble of the World Trade Center Thursday, Sept. 13, 2001, in New York. The search for survivors and the recovery of the victims continues since Tuesday's terrorist attack. (AP Photo/Beth A. Keiser)

This undated photo of two metal beams, center, that form a cross that rises out of the destruction at the World Trade Center, was made available in New York, Thursday, Oct. 4, 2001. The cast iron "cross," which fell intact from Tower One into nearby Building Six on Sept. 11., was blessed on Thursday by Rev. Brian Jordan, a Franciscan priest, as rescue workers who have adopted it as a symbol of faith gathered around to watch. (AP Photo/Pool)

Father Brian Jordan, second from left, blesses, Thursday, Oct. 4, 2001, a cross of steel beams found amidst the rubble of the World Trade Center by a laborer two days after the collapse of the twin towers. The cross was from World Trade tower One, and was found in World Trade building Six and moved to its present location Wednesday. Other rescue and construction workers join Jordan for the ceremony. A protective mesh hangs on the building in the background. (AP Photo/Pool, Kathy Willens)

And over the years, the country rebuilt and the memorials arose…

Buttigieg: White Nationalism the Most Deadly Form of Terrorism in the United States

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By Charlie Spiering

Mayor Pete Buttigieg continues warning of the rising threat of white nationalism, telling voters in Iowa over the weekend he believed that it was the most deadly form of terrorism in the United States.

“White Nationalist violence has killed more people on American soil than any other source of terrorism,” he told voters in Shenandoah, Iowa, on Saturday. “We got to name that, confront that and say that is not us.”

The audience of Iowa Democrats applauded and cheered Buttigieg’s statement.

Buttigieg did not compare statistics between violent attacks from white nationalists in the United States and attacks conducted or inspired by radical Islamic terrorists such as the 2,977 Americans killed in the 9/11 terrorist attacks, the Pulse Nightclub shooting, the San Bernardino shooting, the Boston Marathon bombing, or the shooting at a military base in Fort Hood, Texas.

The South Bend mayor frequently warns about the existential threat posed by white nationalists as he continues his run for president.

“It could be the lurking issue that ends this country in the future if we don’t wrangle it down in our time,” he told ABC News on Saturday.

Buttigieg’s warnings about white nationalism frequently fit with his message of how Democrats will keep America more secure than Republicans.

In March, he accused President Donald Trump of failing to protect America from the threat of white nationalism in an interview with the Intercept.

“He is failing to protect us from the clear and present dangers that white nationalism poses,” Buttigieg said, arguing that Trump was “probably sympathetic” to their ideology.

He also indicated in an interview with Buzzfeed in March that Trump supporters were “complicit” in the rise of the threat posed by white nationalists.

“I think the moment you come on board with a project like the Trump campaign or the Trump-Pence administration, you are at best complicit in the process that has given cover for the flourishing and the resurgence of white nationalism in our midst,” he said.

During his speech in June outlining his foreign policy agenda, Buttigieg argued that “right-wing extremists” had killed more Americans than radical Islamic terrorists “in the past decade,” which excludes the horrific death toll of 9/11.

“We need to acknowledge this threat too and redirect appropriate resources to combat right-wing extremism and violent white nationalism,” he stated.

In July, Buttigieg said that the racial imbalance of the death penalty helped enforce white supremacy in the United States.

“You can see it in the simple fact that someone convicted of the same crime is more likely to face the death penalty if they are black,” he said. “Not to mention the very ugly history of the way that judicial and extra-judicial killings have been used to enforce white supremacy through American history.”

Trump was asked by reporters in March about whether he believed that white nationalism posed a greater threat to the world after the mosque shootings in New Zealand.

“I don’t really,” he replied. “I think it’s a small group of people that have very, very serious problems, I guess.”

Rashida Tlaib: ‘I’m Not Going Nowhere’ Until I Impeach Trump

DETROIT, MI - JULY 22: U.S. Rep. Rashida Tlaib (D-MI) speaks at the opening plenary session of the NAACP 110th National Convention at the COBO Center on July 22, 2019 in Detroit, Michigan. The convention is from July 20 to July 24 with the theme of, "When We Fight, We …

By Joshua Caplan

Rep. Rashida Tlaib (D-MI) declared Monday that she is “not going nowhere, not until I impeach this president,” in a speech before the NAACP national convention in Detroit.

Tlaib’s pledge comes after the president has repeatedly challenged the Michigan lawmaker and fellow “Squad” members — Reps. Ilhan Omar (D-MN), Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY), and Ayanna Pressley (D-MA) — to leave the United States over their frequent attacks on the country.

“We need bold action, folks. I know what’s happening out there… it’s beyond just the four of us,” Tlaib told the crowd. “The squad is all of you. I can tell you, you are all the squad, trust me. If you support equity, you support justice, you are one of us.”

Tlaib, the first Palestinian-American woman in Congress, infamously called for President Trump to be removed just hours after being sworn as a House member earlier this year, pledging to progressive activists, “we’re gonna go in there and we’re going to impeach the motherfucker.”

President Trump on Monday re-upped his criticism of Tlaib and the “Squad,” tweeting that the far-left clique is a “very Racist group of troublemakers who are young, inexperienced, and not very smart.”

“They are pulling the once great Democrat Party far left, and were against humanitarian aid at the Border…And are now against ICE and Homeland Security. So bad for our Country!” he added.

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Tlaib, of course, is no stranger to controversy.

The Michigan Democrat has repeatedly come under fire for uttering antisemitic statements since arriving in Washington last year, including falsely claiming Palestinians offered a “safe haven” for Jews fleeing the Holocaust, whitewashing Palestinian opposition to Jewish immigration and its leadership’s collaboration with Adolf Hitler.

Despite Tlaib and Omar both denying they are antisemitic, the pair of Muslim lawmakers co-introduced a measure last week that supports the anti-Israel Boycott, Divestment, and Sanctions (BDS) movement against the Jewish state.

AMERICANS RALLY BEHIND TRUMP AS HE TELLS AMERICA HATERS THEY “CAN’T LEAVE FAST ENOUGH”

Watch Live: Americans Rally Behind Trump As He Tells America Haters They "Can't Leave Fast Enough"

POTUS calls out Democrats for trying to turn America into sh**hole

By David Knight

David Knight hosts this live, Monday broadcast to fill you in on the weekend’s top news and to provide a preview of what’s to come this week.

President Trump sent a message to Democrats Sunday, calling out “Progressive” Congresswomen who came from failing countries only to tell America how to run its government.

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Tucker: The Democratic Party is now a religious cult

PUBLISHED ON JULY 8, 2019

Big Swin76
Women of color are so oppressed in this country, says a woman who’s religion oppresses millions of women all over the world. 🤨🤨

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Florentina Weber
There you go , they are eating each other in their own party ….. isn’t that beautiful???? Good , the other party is busy running a country .

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Ken Robison
They wanna overthrow a duly elected president because of their political and criminal crimes. Mr. President drain that swamp!

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AP B
“The goal of Socialism is Communism.” Vladimir Lenin

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Gene Set
I wish they would put this much energy into stopping human trafficking. It’s happening everyday.

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Nimisha Acharya
Asylum for Tommy Robinson. The UK is persecuting innocent citizens. OUTRAGEOUS

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Bonnie Nix
Talib and her fellow justice Democrats idiots should be ran out of Congress. We need people in our government that love America and the freedoms and opportunity patriots love🇺🇸🇺🇸🇺🇸👏

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randalthor13
Blah Blah Blah, People of coulour. So it is now all about skin colour and not merit or knowledge. What a joke America has become.

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Jennifer Christensen
These leftist lunatics have played the ‘racist’ card for too long, that now it has no meaning whatsoever. In fact they bring out the race card only because they have no real grievance to air. You are right to call it a cult. Because like all cults they rely on violence and threats to impose their will on others.

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